NY Times Chocolate Chip Cookies

27 Feb

NY Times Chocolate Chip Cookies

So this one night, when my brother and I were teenagers, we were driving home from a dance. (Well, my brother was driving.) It was raining and stormy and hard to see and my brother was jamming out to the radio, singing dramatically, basically every parent’s worst nightmare. We went around a sharp turn way too fast and lost control. I was certain we were going to die. My brother almost killed me. Miraculously, we didn’t die. Instead, we were heading straight for a field with a long row of trees and slid right in between two of them until we came to a stop. He looked at me. I was OK. He was OK. The car was OK. No need to tell the parents, right? Of course right. Until now. Mother and father, my bro crashed your car once.

My brother got married last weekend. It was a spectacular affair. The night before their wedding, my brother orchestrated a concert/storytelling night. There were beautiful songs, and a few stories. He directed me to tell some funny stories about him. I used this moment to tell this car-crashing story that we had sworn each other to secrecy about many years ago. Seemed like an apropos time, right?

You know what it’s also an appropriate time for? COOKIES. More cookies.

I’ve been making this recipe for years, so I thought it’s about time I shared it with you. If you haven’t had the pleasure of tasting the famous NY Times Chocolate Chip cookies, now is your chance. The recipe originally comes from Jacques Torres and was published in the NY Times a whopping 5 years ago. It stands the test of time.

I strongly recommend the use of a kitchen scale for these cookies. I’m guessing great pains were taken to determine the amount of flour needed for this ULTIMATE recipe, so I always use my kitchen scale when measuring my ingredients for this recipe.

This recipe is a bit more involved than your regular, off-the-back-of-the-chocolate-chips-bag recipe. But. It makes them that much better. These cookies don’t get flat. It’s amazing! And the combination of the saltier dough with the dark chocolate is something to be savored. Beware: the dough must be refrigerated for at least 4 hours before baking (the original recipe says 24 hours, but I’ve found an impatient 4 hours works just fine).

NY Times Chocolate Chip Cookies

Stir together your dry ingredients.

NY Times Chocolate Chip CookiesCombine your butter and sugars.

NY Times Chocolate Chip CookiesAnd eggs and vanilla.

NY Times Chocolate Chip CookiesCombine dry ingredients with butter/sugar combo, and mix for a few seconds with the mixer until partially combined.

NY Times Chocolate Chip CookiesFinish mixing by hand.

NY Times Chocolate Chip CookiesGet your chocolate ready.

NY Times Chocolate Chip CookiesAdd the chocolate to the dough. Yummm!

NY Times Chocolate Chip CookiesNow comes the hard part. Wait it out while the dough refrigerates for at least 4 hours.

NY Times Chocolate Chip CookiesThen—glorious day—make your large doughballs. About two tablespoons’ worth of dough per cookie!

NY Times Chocolate Chip CookiesBake to puffed perfection.

NY Times Chocolate Chip CookiesReady to eat!

NY Times Chocolate Chip Cookies

Makes about 3 dozen large cookies

Ingredients

2 cups minus 2 tablespoons (8 1/2 ounces) cake flour (or 8 1/2 ounces all-purpose)
1 2/3 cups (8 1/2 ounces) bread flour
1 1/4 teaspoons baking soda
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1 1/2 teaspoons coarse salt
2 1/2 sticks (1 1/4 cups) unsalted butter, room temperature
1 1/4 cups (10 ounces) brown sugar
1 cup plus 2 tablespoons (8 ounces) granulated sugar
2 large eggs
2 teaspoons natural vanilla extract
1 1/4 pounds bittersweet chocolate disks, at least 60 percent cacao content (can buy at Whole Foods or Jacques Torres) OR a combination of dark and semisweet chocolate equalling 1 1/4 pounds, roughly chopped

Directions

In a large bowl, mix together the cake flour, bread flour, baking soda, baking powder, and salt. Set aside. (If you don’t have all those fancy flours, just substitute 17 ounces unbleached, all-purpose flour.)

In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat together the butter, brown sugar, and granulated sugar for a full 5 minutes, scraping down the sides of the bowl as necessary. The butter/sugar mixture should be light and fluffy. Add the eggs, one at a time, beating for 1 minute after each addition, until fully mixed. Add the vanilla extract and beat until combined.

Add the flour mixture to the butter/sugar mixture, and beat for a few seconds until partially mixed. Now remove the mixer from the stand, and mix by hand just until mixed. (It’s OK if you still see some flour flakes—you’ll be mixing a little more when you add the chocolate.)

If you have the bittersweet disks, add them now, and mix gently to distribute them evenly throughout the dough. If you’re using a combination of other chocolate, chop it up, then mix gently to distribute evenly throughout the dough.

Place a piece of plastic wrap directly onto the dough, covering it completely. Then wrap another piece of plastic wrap over the entire bowl, and refrigerate for 4 to 24 hours before baking. (This is key to puffy, non-flat cookies!)

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper or a silicone baking mat. Take 1 1/2 to 2 tablespoons of dough, and form into large cookie dough balls. Bake for 15-18 minutes (depending on the size of the cookies) until golden brown on edges. Let cool on the cookie sheet for 5 minutes, then remove to a wire rack to cool completely.

Adapted from here

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2 Responses to “NY Times Chocolate Chip Cookies”

  1. Tess March 1, 2013 at 12:23 am #

    Your story reminds me of when I broke the news to my mom at my brother’s wedding that I spilled red nail polish on the carpet in my bedroom. She was seriously ticked at me for doing it then, but it was for my own survival. She calmed way down by the time she actually saw it.

    I will definitely be trying this recipe one of these days.

    • Adrianne March 1, 2013 at 9:44 am #

      Yes!! I’ve decided weddings are perfect times to drop little bombshells like this. They can’t help but have their anger be lessened by the bells & whistles and just general feeling of love in the air.

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